General

How to choose a proper running shoes for you?

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30 Jul 2016 - General
 
  • Running Shoe Categories

Road-running shoes are designed for pavement and occasional forays onto packed surfaces with slight irregularities. Light and flexible, they're made to cushion or stabilize feet during repetitive strides on hard, even surfaces.

Trail-running shoes are designed for off-road routes with rocks, mud, roots or other obstacles. They are enhanced with aggressive tread for solid traction and fortified to offer stability, support and underfoot protection.

Cross-training shoes are designed for gym or Crossfit workouts or any balance activity where having more contact with the ground is preferred over a thick platform sole. 

  • How Do You Run?

Pronation shows a wear pattern centralized to the ball of the foot and a small portion of the heel. It is the foot's natural inward roll following the heel striking the ground.

Basic (neutral) pronation helps absorb impact, relieving pressure on knees and joints. It is a normal trait of neutral, biomechanically efficient runners.

Overpronation is identified by wear patterns along the inside edge of your shoe, and is an exaggerated form of the foot's natural inward roll.

Overpronation is a common trait that affects the majority of runners, leaving them at risk of knee pain and injury. Overpronators need stability or motion control shoes.

Supination (also called under-pronation) is marked by wear along the outer edge of your shoe. It is an outward rolling of the foot resulting in insufficient impact reduction at landing.

Relatively few runners supinate, but those who do need shoes with plenty of cushioning and flexibility.

Barefoot/minimalist running: In traditional running shoes, feet tend to hit the ground heel first. This is because a shoe heel has an elevated cushion. With barefoot runners, it is the mid-foot or forefoot that strikes the ground first.

  • Types of Running Shoes

Neutral shoes: They can work for mild pronators, but are best for neutral runners or people who supinate (tent to roll outward). These shoes provide some shock absorption and some medial (arch-side) support.

Some super-cushioned shoes provide as much as 50% more cushioning than traditional shoes for even greater shock absorption.

Stability shoes: Good for runners who exhibit mild to moderate overpronation. They often include a firm "post” to reinforce the arch side of each midsole, an area highly impacted by overpronation.

Motion control shoes: Best for runners who exhibit moderate to severe overpronation, they offer features such as stiffer heels or a design built on straighter lasts to counter overpronation.

 

You can also find out how you can find the right shoes for you depending on your foot arch too. The wet foot test can be used to identify your arch, whether you are flat footed, neutral or high arched. To do this, wet yout foot and place it on a paper. Compare your foot print to those of high arched, flat footed or neutral ones (you may search for it)

I am a beginner in running and I learned about using the right running shoes the hard way. I tried to train harder and longer which worne...
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