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5 secret weapons that you won’t learn in medical school
 

5 secret weapons that you won’t learn in medical school

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If you think you have learnt everything in your medical school, you could be wrong. We present to you five secret weapons that you most likely did not learn via formal education.
 
today.mims.com
 
1 Aug 2016 - General
 
In India, practicing medicine is still quite 'community'based and people's bias exists,however sweet tongue you are, people tend to ALWAYS take a 'second opinion'and 'compare 'the same treatment.advice with other doctors in that locality, for all medical activities be it consulting a doctor or investigations or buying medicines
.Many doctors do have an 'apathetic' attitude ,overcharging patients of a certain community,etc which is again 'community b...
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“A thick skin”, “Curiosity”, “Patience”, “Courage to ask”, and “Stamina”, are some of the important characteristic of a good doctor. But it is not quite fair to say that medical students won’t be able to learn those during medical school. From my point of view, I do think that good competitive medical students will learn those traits during medical schools, mainly from self learning, rather than from the traditional classroom lecture. Medical students always need to have the courage to ask for ...
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What med books nor any lecture told me that I learned when I threw myself into the water, unknowingly that sharks and other predators swim in them too, is character and humility. Always be humble that you will never always be the best, someone will always be better than you and you should always take it as an opportunity to be a better version of yourself. It also taught me optimism. I can't remember how many times I told myself before that "This too shall pass.". That everything c...
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"He who studies medicine without books sails an uncharted sea, but he who studies medicine without patients does not go to sea at all” -- I remember studying the different cases on books and just memorizing their names. And when I encounter "book" stuff on my patients I am in great awe. It really goes hand in hand. We learn to be able to know how to treat the different cases, but we have to encounter the actual cases, to really understand what we've read in books. It's a c...
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Thick skin, curiosity, patience, courage to ask, stamina---yes, these are all very important. Thick skin is very important because criticism wil come from all directions (patients, family, friends, colleagues). You will be criticized for your work or for things you said, but you cannot always take it personally. You cannot, of course, shrug it off and not care, but the skin you develop should be protection enough for your emotions so that you can process the events in ways that will be more cons...
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Ziwei Xie My thick skin is at its thickest state during general surgery residency. I am in charge of seeing all surgical subspecialties, even urology patients. I've examined so many genitalias and anorectal regions. Also, in women with moderate to severe abdominal pain, I always do gynecologic exam to rule out infections etc. So far, only a few refused and hospital protocol dictates that I have to make them ...
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Leothel Elysse Mayores: I can tell you really want to be a doctor so I know you will love the hospital. It isn't easy, as you may already know, but all the hardships will be so worth it. My advice to you is build a good support system. My group mates during clerkship/ junior internship were the best people to be group mates with. We helped each other out in patient monitoring, we didn't leave the other ha...
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"He who studies medicine without books sails an uncharted sea, but he who studies medicine without patients does not go to sea at all”, said Sir William Osler."- How do you expect to become a healer when you haven't done the act of healing yourself? @Ziwei: Thick skin! Definitely thick skin. I feel I have always been a patient person but medicine really pushed me to a lot more patient than ever before. I agree that it should be pointed more towards us mustering up the courage to as...
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Thanks for all the responses @ Marinelle. I quite agree with you on the point that medical school trained your "thick skin". You mentioned having thick skin to ask classmate and professors for assistance. Do you have courage to ask patient to allow you to examine their private areas? When I was doing obstetric and gynaecology, I was initially hesitant to ask the lady to allow me to perform a gynaecological examination on them. Embarrassment totally overwhelmed me. However as clinical e...
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I'm in med school and I have, to some degree, these qualities. I need a thick skin to survive. You can't survive med school alone, and I have learned to ask help from people I would otherwise would not approach. You really need to be curious in med school. I agree with Marinelle that you should not just study to pass but study to learn. Curiosity is a big factor in learning. We have weekly small group discussions about cases and curiosity is what will lead you to know what your patient&#...
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I totally disagree with this article. I developed all those qualities when I was a medical student, which also includes medical clerkship. 1) A thick skin - You can't get through medical school without having this. No matter how embarrassing it is, you will eventually ask your classmates to share reference materials/personal notes with you, or you ask professors directly how you can improve your grade (if you're close to failing). 2) Curiosity - How can you even be a student without havi...
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Do you al agree these are important for a doctor? I totally agree. A thick skin is not for asking patients question but for asking the senior consultant to let you stitch up the abdominal surgical wound. asking the registrar to let you try the hernia repair while he guide you or for the dermatologist to let you try the punch biopsy. A lot of skills that we observe as a junior doctor but never have the courage to do. Started to regret now when I realized how much I missed. Medicine is probably th...
 (Total 100 words)