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Locked vs. unlocked psychiatric wards: Reducing escape and suicide attempts
 

Locked vs. unlocked psychiatric wards: Reducing escape and suicide attempts

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New research has shown that psychiatric patients who are locked up in their wards tend to exhibit more tendencies towards escaping and suicide due to feeling ‘caged up’ as compared to wards that are unlocked.
 
today.mims.com
 
16 Aug 2016 - General
 
For safety purposes, most of the in-hospital psychiatric wards that I have encountered are located in the basement with its main door locked and guarded by several personal. In the institution where I'm working at, most of the time psychiatric patients can roam around the premises and those who are perceived to be harmful and suicidal have their own personal watchers. They are not tailed closely but they are usually watched from afar. Psychiatry residents frequently visit their assigned pati...
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i remember working in the psychiatry ward when i just started nursing. It holds a locked padded room. Initially to target those suicidal and violent ones. But after a few years the used it as a storage room. The consultants were starting on a new approach to patients where locked padded rooms are not his option. It is to give a homely feeling and give them a sense of importance in order to reverse psycho them in a way of treatment. Also, these padded rooms are not really helpful in my opinion du...
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In our hospital setting, the psychiatry ward's main door is locked all the time but the patients can move freely inside the ward. Only patients with acute psychiatric problems were locked in an isolated ward. This has been effective for psychiatric patients' recovery upon my observation during senior internship. Also, agitated patients should not be restricted as it will result in further agitation. Some even advocate the use of Craig bed (bed with padding on all four sides) for severely...
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That's true, there is a big risk. I remember that story of the Psychiatric patient. Anyway, I have an aunt who is in a home. I did talk about her before. When she used to live with my grandma it was hard because she would go out and run off to wherever. She's not a danger to people, but being a woman, that's dangerous for her. Anyway, the home she's confined in is nice. It's in the province and the yard is big. It doesn't look and feel like a hospital, but of course there...
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When I read the title of the article and started reading through I realized how familiar everything sounded. Turns out back July 30 Ziwei Xie posted an article from another website about this here (https://community.mims.com/medical/10825/locking-doors-in-mental-health-hospitals-does-not-lower-suicide-rate). Let me share my comment to that post before as it is still relevant: I could definitely see how having an ...
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I think the problem with most mental institutions is that patients are locked--hidden. Maybe for the safety of the patient, but also perhaps to keep the world safe from the potential danger they may cause. People are "naturally" afraid of mental patients because their behavior is unpredictable. But I think that by "locking" them inside you are preventing any cure to comeforth.

“An important aspect of psychiatric care is to help restore a patient’s confidence and sel...
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