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Liposuction gone wrong: widower sues doctor, clinic and company to seek damages
 

Liposuction gone wrong: widower sues doctor, clinic and company to seek damages

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A liposuction procedure in Singapore went horribly wrong when Madam Yeong Soek Mun, then 44, collapsed half an hour after the procedure and passed away two and a half hours later. Her widower is suing three parties to seek compensation.
 
today.mims.com
 
18 Aug 2016 - General
 
Tarah Cadiz: Yes unfortunately headlines like this without reading the whole article is just bad rep. It is although very eye catching which I believe was the point of the writer to draw in readers to read through the article. Unlike some of the other articles about lawsuits that we have discussed on here so far, this seems to be the most neutral sounding. The other articles plainly sided with the patient and dee...
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I aspire to be a plastic surgeon. I once asked a plastic surgeon if being one puts her at risk for more lawsuits. She did stress out that there is a waiver to be signed, like all planned and offered procedures. The surgeon is not liable for the satisfaction of the patient as per the physical outcome of the procedure. However, like most procedures it does have its surgical complications, such a compartment syndrome, pulmonary embolism, hematoma, etc. Which should always be disclosed.

I f...
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It is definitely a choice to undergo liposuction. Vanity does bring sanity after all, but it comes with a price. Although the chances of complications to arise are slim the possibility is still there. It would be best to have a witness around during the signing of a the consent form but as long as the procedure was thoroughly explained and it was stated on the consent form that was signed by the patient there should be no finger pointing. It is obviously an act of grief on the part of the husban...
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I agree with everyone's comments about the lack of full disclosure in the case. As Marinelle Castro has already stated, there is a very slim chance of mortality due to pulmonary embolism after a liposuction procedure. Regardless of this minute percentage, it should have still been disclosed to the patient. Every risk should be discussed with the patient and put in writing if he/she agrees. Also, you are right...
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According to a study done by the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic surgery, the complication rate of liposuctions performed by plastic surgery specialists is 0.25% with an overall mortality rate of of 0.002%. 0.01% of the mortality rate is usually attributable to pulmonary embolism. This is a rare and a devastating cause of death from a non-urgent procedure. I agree with the comments that there might have been a communication problem between the patient and the surgeon. Even if he did not sp...
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There should be informed consent and consent form signed prior to the procedure. If a patient were to go ahead with a procedure - in this case, liposuction, the doctor should have explained the indications, contraindications, side effects, complications, process of the procedure and alternative options as well as the recommended management to the patient before the signature was taken, hence if the consent form was signed, there should be no medicolegal negligence on the doctor's. However, t...
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It seems like there was a lack of a proper line of communication here. Fat embolism is a definite risk in liposuction and is explained to patients pre-op. I understand the sentiments of the widower. Imagine losing your loved one due to a complication of a vanity procedure. If they were undergoing a surgery due to trauma and got a fat embolism secondary to this, it would be more acceptable. In the latter part of the article the writer stated that the coroner had harsh words to say namely, "a...
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