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Evidence-based medicine in polypharmacy:  When is enough really enough for your patients?
 

Evidence-based medicine in polypharmacy: When is enough really enough for your patients?

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The challenge for most doctors is that patients often do not want to hear about the science during consultations; they simply want a pill or an action that will fix their problems.
 
today.mims.com
 
25 Sep 2016 - General
 
Like what Lianne Marie Victoria Laruan has said, people have this perception that a basic consultation with a doctor comprises of "getting a queue number, meeting the doctor, collecting medicine and paying the bill". Collecting medicine has become incongruous with a doctor visit, and the more ill you feel, the more medicine you may expect.

When it comes to procedures, people also tend to have t...
 (Total 95 words)
Like what Lianne Marie Victoria Laruan has said, people have this perception that a basic consultation with a doctor comprises of "getting a queue number, meeting the doctor, collecting medicine and paying the bill". Collecting medicine has become incongruous with a doctor visit, and the more ill you feel, the more medicine you may expect.

When it comes to procedures, people also tend to have t...
 (Total 95 words)
Lianne Marie Victoria Laruan That is true. With multiple specialties involved, duplication of prescription is a big risk. One must really ferret out all the illnesses, maintenance medications, and prescribed medications. The danger lies especially with prescribing multiple NSAIDs. NSAIDs should only be used for the short-term and different class of NSAIDs have different side effects. Amplifying effect of same cl...
 (Total 151 words)
It’s true that some patients aren’t satisfied when they come from a doctor who doesn’t give them a prescription; as if they were short-changed of the fees they’ve paid. This then forces physicians to dole out prescriptions just so the patient would feel that his visit to the doctor was worth it. Such a notion should really be discouraged, as not all patients who come to the doctor need medications. On the topic of polypharmacy - though a lot of patients would need more than one drug, health care...
 (Total 181 words)
The article not only discusses polypharmacy but also unnecessary ancillary/diagnostic procedures and interventions. Often we encounter a medical dilemma when a diagnosis requires only dietary and lifestyle medication. For example, a patient with impaired fasting glucose but not yet classified as a diabetic would often not be content with advise of dietary modification and exercise. He/she will always shop for another doctor until a pill is described. Another thing with polypharmacy is failing to...
 (Total 125 words)