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Doctor shortage in the Philippines: An analysis
 

Doctor shortage in the Philippines: An analysis

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Countless Filipinos have yet to be seen by a doctor and could end up dying without ever being seen by one. What factors contribute to the shortage in medical professionals to handle the public healthcare sector in the Philippines?
 
today.mims.com
 
18 Nov 2016 - General
 
Our country's healthcare should not be held hostage by scrupulous government officials who do not care about the people's well being. I feel the growing frustration of serving the indigents but with the lack of support from local government we are reduced to archaic if not unupdated means of treating patient. The moment one doctor introduced our hospital as a political hospital, I knew then that no matter how much knowledge I carried would amount to nothing as we were all under the power...
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This article truly reveals the actual situation here in the Philippines for doctors. Definitely there is a large shortage in man power as you can feel it greatly when you work even in the so called saturated with doctors areas. The mention about salary is truly an issue as well as was discussed in the topic Mark Edmon Tan mentioned from before, we are paid quite low. In government institutions where doctors see a...
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It’s just shocking to read that a lot of Filipinos do not get to see a doctor in their entire life. A statistic of 1:33,000 is just too sad to contemplate. I agree that it isn’t a shortage, but a maldistribution. In large cities and urban areas, we don’t feel the lack of medical services and being able to see a doctor, because there are so many private practitioners that are readily accessible, not realizing that in the rural areas, there is a very pressing need for community doctors. I think th...
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Just taking notice - before DOH supported hospitals and local government hospitals are able to provide, no matter how sparingly, to the patients seeking their assistance. Nowadays, these facilities all depend, or encroach on the resources of PhilHealth. The meager resources are further cut up. Furthermore, with due respect, the nonpaying "indigents" eat up more the constrained resources. Why hasn't Congress not allocated funds for this specific sector instead of these our needy bro...
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Fundings and financial support of the Department of Health on subspecialty machines like more dialysis machines, increase emphasis on chemotherapy intervention on Cancer and the like takes away funds from being utilized by a vaster number of people. The action of the DOH on these things is much appreciated but apparently curative or palliative has set a priority over preventative, or early intervention and rehabilitation. These should be weighed properly. PhilHealth should also revise or altoget...
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I look forward to the day when I can see a model of Phil. Health Care system where the first line of the system is the duly trained Family Physician as in other countries. In fact, to make health care more affordable, accessible and attainable, the Family Physician should be the frontliner. Sadly too, even the health maintenance organization who are supposed to benefit from the set-up of Family Medicine based system requires a subspecialist - because the subspecialist is ATTRACTIVE TO MARKET for...
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1:33,000 is a pitiful statistic--can we expect that people are being cared for properly at this rate? When I go out for missions, I meet people who haven't seen a doctor ever in their lives, and it is sad. Not having seen a dentist is a common thing--we are not exactly a health priority, but for people to have no experience seeing a doctor... it is concerning. I believe that salary is and will always define how our health system will be. Schooling is too expensive, people would want a ROI, s...
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The pressure for government to pay or subsidize medical education is of no direct correlation with loyalty to serve in the Philippines. A lot of "Scholar ng Bayan" are serving in the US and other countries. What is essential is making do and maximizing the present order of things by focusing on Primary Care system and not lionizing subspecialty needs over what is the common good for the greater number. Compensation may be a consideration but the most important thing is to build a RESPO...
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Thank you Plaza Hub for posting this topic that warrants urgent discussion. There was a previous post comparing the average salaries of doctors from different countries. It was sad to see that the compensation for Filipino doctors was near the bottom of that list. One could not blame doctors for wanting to be properly compensated because it is also the primary source of income. Moreover, the government not only do...
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The subjective shortage over the quantitative shortage is further amplified by the iatrogenic induced shortage - subspecialized medical equipments induced. Medical care has become subservient to availability of dialysis machines, CT scans, Ultrasound and 2D Echo equipments etc benefiting fewer beneficiaries has become so totally dependent on finite FUNDS. Highly prohibitive costing that could have been distributed more fruitfully to a greater number of recipients benefits tertiary care on the p...
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Even the unseen rule in professional compensation among physicians has shown a skewed disfavorably towards the subspecialty specialty, cutting up a single individual into subspecialty parts of several medical providers, while out there, a large segment of the population can barely meet a physician in their life. If ever they would be courageous enough to overcome their cultural fear of seeing a doctor, they have to overcome the fear of cost of shouldering the expense which is so constrictive if...
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