General

How would you deal with parents who do not want to vaccinate their children?

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1 Jul 2016 - General
 

As health care professionals, we all know what vaccines are and how they prevent life-threatening diseases. With ease of information in this modern era, however, more and more resources on anti-vaccination are popping up, and the debate on being pro- or anti-vaccination still rages. Vaccines have long been controversial, especially in the US and other Western countries, where parents have argued that certain vaccines have caused undesirable effects on their children such as Asperger's syndrome, learning disabilities, and ADHD, as well as other injurious effects. I have seen various videos and read articles debating whether or not vaccines are safe, and thus, should not be made mandatory. Some of the points may be believable, and to many parents, this information may not be taken lightly. I just wanted to ask if you’ve ever encountered parents who didn’t want to vaccinate their children? If so, how did you deal with such a situation? And if you haven’t yet, how do you suggest health care professionals deal with such a situation?

Thanks for your comment, Dr. Chua! Hmm, given that thought, I agree that the statistics and evidence-based approach may not be appropriate for every patient, especially for those that may not be very well acquainted with such data. Maybe some patients would get even more defensive and yes, distrust can get in the way. I think what you shared regarding showing them the complications of non-compliance is a great idea and can convince many of them. Have you tried this approach yet and was it effect...
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Firstly, I believe that it is a statutory requirement for children to be vaccinated under the national vaccination campaigns in most countries. Parents are liable for legal action if they do not comply. But it would be better if this is not used as it really sours the patient doctor relationships. Re: Lianne’s comment: I think the statistics and evidence based approach should only be selectively used. This is because in certain segments of the population. This can be misconstrued as an attempt ...
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Thank you for your comment, Ziwei Xei! I think you did a great job in convincing the angry mum to have her child vaccinated. It's fortunate that you were armed with the right information at hand that was useful in convincing this parent. I guess we should really be updated with evidence-based information and statistics that will debunk the myths surrounding the dangers of vaccination. After all, giving a vaccine actually makes the benefits of prevention outweigh the risks of contracting dead...
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One of my family medicine examination OSCE station was an angry mum refusing to vaccinate her child for measle. She threw a newspaper cutting at me about a child in Italy who was awarded a lump some of money after developing autism following MMR vaccination.(http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2160054/MMR-A-mothers-victory-The-vast-majority-doctors-say-link-triple-jab-autism-Italian-court-case-reignite-controversial-debate.html). I managed to convince the mum after telling her 1) The inciden...
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