General

Would you prescribe a new drug over an older, "tried-and-tested" drug?

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3 Jul 2016 - General
 

A lot of new drugs are being discovered, approved and released every week. These new drugs are sometimes aggressively marketed to physicians, and if they are over-the-counter, are aggressively marketed through the media, despite sometimes being more expensive (as new drugs usually have exclusive patents to a single company so that company can dictate the price). I often wonder if physicians prefer to prescribe these newer drugs rather than sticking to the drugs that they’ve known to be effective. I wanted to ask the physicians here: what can make you prescribe a new drug? If a new drug came out that was relevant to your specialty, would you immediately prescribe or recommend such a drug to your patients, or would you prefer prescribing an "older" drug that you know more about?

Dr. Inserto, thanks for your input! yes I guess its a good idea that we "wait and see" first, and also how other professionals react to the drug. Dr. Winter, Thanks too for your comments! The points you put down to consider prescribing a new drug are quite sound. Prescribing a drug only after Phase 4 Clinical trials is a good idea, as it is in this phase that side effects and adverse effects arise that were not seen in Phases 1-3. Also, its a good thing to consider if the drug can be ...
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Just an addition to what I said. Now if the new drug shows promising capabilities, it has been proven to more potent, provides something that other drugs can't, is immediately life saving and would be taken for a short course (not as maintenance) YES I would consider prescribing it. In the case of a patient who has cancer and has tried other medications or has contraindications to the already available drug I will not keep this keep from prescribing the new drug if it may possibly save the p...
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I always prescribe medications that I am familiar with. I get approached my medical representatives and they offer their products to me, but I find that it takes me quite a while to really give attention to them. If it is a stronger or more refined formulation of a drug I have been prescribing, switching does not pose a big issue, unless cost it. But with brand new names, I always want to “wait and see” first, how it performs in the market and how it is met by other professionals, before I intro...
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Hi Lianne, this is a great topic for discussion. I think the most important factor behind using the new drug or medication is the level of evidence supporting the new drug. Nowadays, the new drug can only be approved and marketed after a robust clinical trial, from Phase 1 to 4. Usually, a well designed, carefully monitor and robust randomized control trial (RCT), which is adequately powered, is required in the development of new drug. Typically, the new drug will be either non-inferior to the ...
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Hi Dr. Abayawickrama, thanks for sharing your opinion! I agree that the drugs we've been using for the past 10 years are more predictable when it comes to patient outcomes and thus may cause lesser harm with side effects easily being anticipated as well. I’ve just noticed that there are many doctors who prescribe newer drugs in the blink of an eye even if there are actually safer and more affordable “older” drugs available. Because of this observation, I got curious and wanted to know physic...
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New drugs, new dosing forms and pharmaceutical formulations enter the market in increasing numbers everyday. Pharmaceutical companies approach doctors and give free samples of the drugs to be given to patients. They provide information about the drugs with results of clinical trials conducted. But I personally am more comfortable prescribing a drug that I have known and prescribed for a very long time. I do agree that the newer drugs can be more efficacious and may have less adverse effects, but...
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