General

Tricks to Minimize Pain During Shots

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4 Jul 2016 - General
 

Giving shots especially to children and some adults can be quite challenging. I have used several tactics when giving IM shots, such as instructing the patients to deeply inhale, and exhale when I am about to go in, or to distract the patient and quickly get the shot done (if the drug is not too viscous). These experiences can be quite traumatizing for kids and sometimes and it takes time to finally coax them to take the shots. There is this one article (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC344294/) that suggests a simple, cost effective and easy technique to reduce pain while taking shots. That is, instruct your patient cough while giving shots. There is even a video posted by National Geographic giving the probable explanation why (https://www.facebook.com/natgeotvUS/videos/10154033960051005/). How about you? What techniques have you used on your patients?

For my really Very-Important- Person patient, I will use ethyl chloride spray before intramuscular injection or other soft tissue injection. It is fast and simple to use. Just put the nozzle 1inch above the site of injection, eject the gas until a white foam form on the site of injection. Inject immediately. To ensure patient has the least pain during injection, the dermis has to be penetrated fast. Once the dermis is penetrated, we can go slow. The injection fluid must not be cold and it must b...
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Yes, distraction is still the best way. I talk to the patient and ease their tension, but I tell them when I am about to deposit because I them to breathe deeply. I've heard of people who distract patients by pinching them--but I have not bothered to try it, I'm afraid the patient might jerk and hit me. Haha. With children, it's a whole different game. Administering anesthesia is hard. Doing it inside the mouth is really difficult, especially when a child does not want to open the mo...
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Thanks for sharing this. This topic is one had been more intensely investigated about 10 years back. You can refer to the review and meta-analysis by Vibhuti et al (http://journals.lww.com/clinicalpain/Fulltext/2015/10001/Pharmacological_and_Combined_Interventions_to.6.aspx). Its conclusion states that by Breastfeeding, topical anesthetics, sweet-tasting solutions, and combination of topical anesthetics and breastfeeding demonstrated evidence of benefit for reducing vaccine injection pain in inf...
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Hi Leothel! When I was rotating in pediatrics, I learned that applying cold compress for 3-5 minutes prior to intramuscular/subcutaneous injections really helped. I presume that this works by the Gate control theory of Melzack and Wall, wherein activation of non-nociceptive nerve fibers can interfere with transmission of pain signals, thereby inhibiting pain. So far it has been very effective for a lot of patients, with a few exceptions of course. I have a colleague who wrote a paper on this, bu...
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