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Dying at home rather than in hospital, elderly Japanese ‘go to the afterlife quietly’
 

Dying at home rather than in hospital, elderly Japanese ‘go to the afterlife quietly’

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TOKYO After he was diagnosed with leukaemia in July Mr Katsuo Saito decided not to treat it and opted for palliative care. He had a hard time finding a bed at a hospice or hospital so he spent most of his remaining weeks at home. There are about 20 people on the waiti
 
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25 Nov 2017 - General
 
Priscilla Mae Gobuyan I agree that finding the place to face death should be honored based on the patient's decision. Though most would wish to seek the best medical care, palliative care encompasses a holistic approach that aims to provide the most comfort to the patient. If the patient finds solace or is more comfortable with palliation at home, then there should be no more room for discussion as to this wi...
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Dying at home or hospital depends on the belief and culture of the patient. As for Filipinos, most of our patients prefer to have their loved ones die in the hospital. Most of them would either sign a consent for DNR or DNI measures. Usual rationale of patients would be, they wanted to give justice and a decent kind of death for their loved ones. They felt like the hospital is a safe place that can take care their needs. On the other hand, some people like Mr. Sato would prefer to die quietly at...
 (Total 140 words)