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Adequate water intake helps decrease weight, BMI
 

Adequate water intake helps decrease weight, BMI

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New research led by Dr. Tammy Chang, assistant professor of family medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that drinking adequate amounts of water might be a key for dieters in their journey to weight loss.
 
today.mims.com
 
14 Jul 2016 - General
 
I love water. I would agree if match water with exercise, Frequent exercise. And i think all would agree that drinking water more then any other sweet or gassy drinks will also reduce the chances of you getting a heart condition, etc. Well, hydrating is important these days especially with the increasing humidity in Singapore. We are advised to drink at least 1 liter of water every hour when we are in the field. I know this might sound ridiculous but it has saved thousands of lives working under...
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@Kathleen & Ziwei - I always wondered why it was so hard for me to gain weight. 29 years later finally I have my answer. Because I drink water! Haha :D I have kids in my paediatric ward who are heavier than me. Brings a tear to my eye when I look at their weight in the admission sheet to calculate drug doses! :D It's my height that puts my BMI so low. I'm 182 cm tall, and with only 52 kg, most of it being gross bone weight, I need 10 more kilos of muscle/fat to be not underweight! So...
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Like, Dr. Castro, I find it skeptical that adequate water intake can aid weight loss. The research did mention the BMI's of 28 and 29, and from what I learned here, BMI over 25 is already considered overweight. Personally, I felt that the research could do with a further study. For now, I will hold to the fact that adequate water intake can help us stay healthy. I, for one would benefit it after all, if further evidences would say that drinking water aids weight loss as it wouldn't be a ...
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God, I should avoid water at all costs. My BMI is already 16, I can't afford to lose any more! :D Just kidding. I'm with Marinelle on this one. BMI is not a very good indicator of fitness in this context, because it does not account for the composition of body weight. Well, perhaps evidence will come to light later that say water increases the height of a person, but for now let's assume the height of a person remains constant. So can drinking water reduce your body weight? The resea...
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I agree with Dr Marinelle Castro. There is no scientific basis linking water consumption to losing weight. This is the very basic first requirement before a cause-effect relationship can be established. The link could be secondary to confounders. Patients who are trying to lose weight maybe consuming more fluid or food with more water contact (fruits ). The patients who drink more could be exercising more and made a more conscious effort to ensure they are well hydrated. The people with more con...
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Just as a rebuttal to this study. I find it odd that additional intake will translate to weight loss. Logically speaking, increasing water intake should increase a person's weight since we don't readily get to eliminate water after consuming it. There are so many factors that can affect a person's propensity to retain fluid despite normal renal function. I think that should be taken into consideration also. In addition, although BMI is easy to measure, it does not distinguish between...
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"Drink lots of water." had always been a health advice as old as time. And why not drink lots of water since it has provided a lot of benefits and it is the most natural cleanse one could have. Now you can forget counting calories and just drink water. This together with exercise and proper diet will surely make you look and feel healthier. Sadly, a lot of energy drinks and health drinks that promised cleansing, weight loss and whatever ailments that you have had caught the consumers&#...
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